Wednesday, 24 May, 2017

United Changes Crew Booking Policy in Wake of Passenger Incident

United Airlines issues a new policy requiring crews to be booked sooner File United Airlines issues a new policy requiring crews to be booked sooner File
Debra Rodriguez | 18 April, 2017, 17:37

Hype, born Collin Nigel McPherson in the Spice Island of Grenada, has released a skit on the incident on Social Media, under the theme, what would have been the reaction if United had tried to remove a West Indian from its flight.

After video went viral of Dr. David Dao being violently dragged off a United plane due to an overbooking issue, the airline has confirmed that it has updated its rules so that crewmembers will need to check in at least one hour before departure time. "Imagine if the tweets from United flight 3411 had been 'Whoa, United just paid four people two grand so they could get their crew to tomorrow morning's Newark flight!' rather than the sight of the airline calling the cops on a 69-year-old man".

Dr Dao refused to give up his seat last weekend on a flight from Chicago to Louisville for the airline's staff who needed to travel.

United Airlines is now under vast scrutiny after a video of a passenger being dragged, bloodied and screaming, off a flight on Sunday went viral.

United said its new policy will ensure a crew member is seated before the plane is full. "This is one of our initial steps in a review of our policies in order to deliver the best customer experience", said United spokesperson Maggie Schmerin in a statement.

After the incident triggered global outrage, United Chief Executive Oscar Munoz apologized to Dao, his family and its customers, saying the carrier would no longer use law enforcement officers to remove passengers from overbooked flights.

But he later struck a more contrite tone in a nationally televised interview. On Friday, company Chairman Robert Milton said the board supported Munoz.

Even before this week, Munoz was under pressure from activist investors to improve the airline's performance, including its customer relations.

Competing airlines are taking note of the controversy and making changes of their own.

Delta Air Lines, in an internal memo obtained Friday by the Associated Press, said that gate agents can now offer up to $2,000, an increase from $800, and that supervisors can offer up to $9,950, from $1,350.

A major U.S. airline is offering compensation of up to $9,950 (£7,950) per person for passengers denied boarding on overbooked flights. It said it would announce the results and any actions by April 30.

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